Manage your farmers market pre-orders

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Permits to Sell at a Farmers Market

Selling food at a farmer’s market (sometimes called a farm market) is one of the most rewarding things you can experience. Making something exactly the way you want to make it, then delivering it to people you’ve never met before and watching them fall in love with a sample of your culinary magic is a fulfilling experience that can hardly be described. Selling ice cream at a farmer’s market, for example, is something that can create lifetime memories! 

But selling at a farmer’s market isn’t as simple as baking your best dish, setting up camp at the market, and passing out samples and taking in payments from impressed market-browsers. There are specific permits to sell at a farmer’s market, which we will discuss in detail. If you’ve ever typed “local farmers market near me” and had the opportunity to go, you’ll appreciate just how much goes into a vendor being able to serve you their delicious offerings! Details from county and state requirements, to a farmers market booth rental cost, and much more are very important! 

A farmer’s market is generally considered a retail market, meaning a food market in which you sell directly to the consumer. In general, although each state will have specific laws, you will need at the minimum a Retail Food Establishment License to operate a booth at a farmer’s market. A Retail Food Establishment License is normally issued by the local county health department in which a particular vendor is based. For this type of license, a vendor will usually need to supply a state sales tax account number in order to receive their license. Additionally, a licensed commercial kitchen will be required for preparation of any food you might desire to sell. In some cases, operators will need to report at least daily to the location in which they prepare their food for supplies, cleaning, and servicing operations. Serving at a farmer’s market isn’t quite as easy as making a recipe in your oven!

What permits do I need to sell at a farmers market?

Keep reading!

Do You Have to Have a Permit to Sell at a Farmers Market?

The short answer is, “Yes!”

Typically, as explained in the section above, there are several licenses and food service certifications you’ll need for things like health inspections, city business licenses, county health department permits, and more, in order to operate your vendor stand at a farmers' market. In some places, you’ll even need insurance and an operator’s license.

A farmers market stall cost might be as low as a few hundred dollars per season (this might last for several months), with more popular and competitive farmers' markets requiring something closer to several hundred dollars per week, and potentially much more. Of course, this doesn’t take into account the basic costs of doing business, buying raw products, and so on. 

This might make you ask, “Is selling at a farmers market worth it?” If you have a great product to offer and the market offers plenty of foot traffic, the answer could easily be “yes,” as some farmers market vendors in some cities can earn hundreds of dollars a day. If you’re wondering about how to sell at a farmers market, it’s a comforting thing to know that there are plenty of others just like you who have gone through the exact process, learned and experimented, and are succeeding!

Selling Crafts at Farmers Market

Food and crafts are great ideas for selling to interested event-goers! But what are the best selling items at a farmers market?

You might try selling lip balms, candles, beeswax, honeycombs, secondhand clothes, corn, herbs and spices, T-shirts, handmade notes, mugs and cups, socks, ornaments, wreaths, and much more! These are a few unique things to sell at farmers markets. The options are endless! If you’re curious about how to sell baked goods at a farmers market, go as a visitor and strike up a conversation with a few popular vendors. They’re usually more than willing to share their advice!

“Do I need a tax ID to sell at a farmers market?”

The best answer is, “It depends.” If you’re selling taxable items, yes! But for food items, you will not. However, when in doubt or if there is a situation in which you’ll need to produce a tax ID, your social security number will usually suffice. In some states, you will need a retail merchant certificate if you’re selling taxable items. It’s best to simply check with your desired farmers market administrators to get information, or, even better, to connect with and learn from successful farmers market vendors who have been operating for a while! Experience matters! 

Farmer Market Permit: Florida

Do you need a permit to sell at a farmers market in Florida?

Yes. Farmers markets in Florida have specific laws that must be followed. 

Some cities, counties and municipalities in Florida may have registration, permitting and licensing requirements, with or without fees, to operate a business in a particular area. This may include an occupational permit, a sales permit, a solicitation license, an agricultural license, or a vendor permit. Because each county in Florida has different requirements, it’s important to check with county food and beverage administrators to secure specific details. Most businesses selling food in Florida farmers' markets will require permitting from either FDACS or DBPR, unless they are exempt from state licensing through the cottage food law.

If you’re just getting started as a food vendor, you’re probably in luck. Most beginner farmers market vendors in Florida would typically fall under the category of a “Cottage Food Operation.”

This kind of operation typically found at a Florida farmers market refers to a natural person or an entity that produces or packages cottage food products at their home. Cottage food operations do not require a license or permit from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and aren’t inspected by the state government. A cottage food operation can’t take in more than $250,000 a year. It’s important to note that any cottage food product has to carry the label, “Made in a cottage food operation that is not subject to Florida’s food safety regulations.”

Of course, any Florida farmers market vendor is still a business and will need to submit to sales tax laws, etc. Make sure to check with each county website to know how to secure your farmers market permit in Florida.

Farmers Market Permit: California

California is the most populous state in America, and there are plenty of farmers markets in operation in this great state each year! 

But what permits do you need to sell at a farmers market in California?

While each county is a little different, let’s start with the state’s largest city: Los Angeles. What permits do you need to sell at a farmers market in Los Angeles? 

In Los Angeles, farmers market vendors must produce a completed Public Health Permit/License Application, business or individual identity documents, such as a Business License, Seller’s Permit, Articles of Incorporation, or California ID (Sole Proprietor). In order to sell agricultural products, farmers must be certified by the Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) of the county in which the agricultural products are grown or raised and must have a current Certified Producers Certificate (CPC). Farmers market vendors must demonstrate compliance with the Health Code Requirements for Community Events in LA County.

The average farmers market stall cost in Los Angeles County might cost as low as $25 per day and up to several hundred dollars a day, depending on the event.

If you want to learn how to become a certified farmer in California, keep reading. A California Certified Producer is a farmer who has been certified by the department of Agriculture, Weights, and Measures (AWM) to sell in certified farmers' markets. AWM inspectors have to visit your farm to verify your agricultural production, upon which they issue a Certified Producer’s Certificate to you, the farmer, which lists the products they grow and may sell in a CFM. CFM operators and Certified Producers have to comply with California Direct Marketing laws and regulations. 

If you wanted to know how to sell at a farmers market in California, now you do!

How to Sell at a Farmers Market in Texas

Ah, Texas! The Lone Star State. Here’s everything you need to know about selling food at a farmers market in Texas. 

Similar to Florida, Texas has cottage food laws that allow vendors to sell shelf-stable food products made in home kitchens without needing to acquire a food manufacturers’ license, use a commercial kitchen, or be subject to inspections by the state or local health departments.

Many farmers market vendors can be considered a temporary food establishment, which is a food establishment that operates for a period of no more than 14 consecutive days in conjunction with a single event or celebration (which would fall under the timetable for most farmers' markets).

For a farmers market permit in Texas, a single event permit is generally valid for one individual food booth or unit at one event, for 14 consecutive days from the initial date. The multiple-event permit is valid for one food booth/unit at several events for 2 years from the initial date, with the stipulation that each event doesn't exceed 14 consecutive days.

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